Times Tables Support for Parents

 

Top Times Tables Tips

 

It may seem a daunting task to learn so many multiplication facts, but because of the commutative property of multiplication, there are fewer facts than you may think. For example, 3 x 4 and 4 x 3 give the same answer so you need to only learn this once.

 

Zero Times Table

Anything multiplied by zero will always equal zero. Multiplication is repeated addition so 3 x 0 is 0 + 0 + 0, which equals 0.

 

One Times Table

Any number multiplied by one is itself.

 

Two Times Table

Any number multiplied by two is double the number. 7 x 2 =14 7 + 7 = 14 double 7 is 14.

 

Three Times Table

Digits within this times table add up to multiples of 3. For example: 3, 6, 9, 12 (1+2=3), 15 (1+5=6), 18 (1+8=9) 21 (2+1=3), 24 (2+4=6) etc. The numbers also follow the pattern of: odd, even, odd, even (3,6,9,12).

 

Four Times Table

The four times table is double the two times table. 4 x 2 = 8, 4 x 4 = 16, 16 is double 8. Alternatively the fours can be thought of as double double. So double 3 (6) and double again (12) is the same as 3 x 4 = 12.

 

Five Times Table

All multiples of 5 end in five or zero. For even numbers (e.g. 8 x 5) you can halve the number (4) and then put a zero after it (40). For odd numbers (e.g. 7 x 5) you can subtract one from the number (6), halve it (3) and then put a 5 after it (35). Any odd number times 5 ends in a 5. Any even number times 5 ends in 0.

 

Six Times Table

The six times table is double the three times table. So 5 x 3 = 15, 5 x 6 = 30, 30 is double 15.

 

Seven Times Table

Combine the 5 and the 2 times table: 7 x 4 = 28 or (5x4) + (2x4) = 28.

 

Eight Times Table

The eight times table is double the four times table. So 7 x 4 = 28, 7 x 8 = 56, 56 is double 28. The units in the multiples of eight also go down in twos. 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80 (8, 6, 4, 2, 0, 8, 6, 4, 2, 0).

 

Nine Times Tables

Fingers can be used to work out the nine times table up to 10 x 9. The first finger is put down for 1 x 9 and the remaining fingers show 9 units (1 x 9 =9). Then the second finer is put down for 2 x 9 and the remaining fingers show 1 ten (to the left) and 8 units (to the right) which equals 18, and so on. 

 

The digits found in the multiples of nine when added together also equal nine. For example: 9 = 9, 18 (1 + 8) = 9, 27 (2 + 7) = 9, 36 (3 + 6) = 9, 45 (4 + 5) = 9 etc.

 

Ten Times Table

All the digits in the ten times table end in zero.

 

Eleven Times Table

Most of the multiples in the eleven times table are recalled by putting two of the number side by side. 7 x 11 = 77, 8 x 11 =88.

 

Twelve Times Table

The units in the twelve times table go up in twos. 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144 (2, 4, 6, 8, 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 0). The multiples of 12 are also the multiples of 10 and the multiples of 2 combined.

 

Below you will find a range of songs that will support children's learning of times tables.

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